1. Skip to content
  2. Skip to main menu
  3. Skip to more DW sites
A Copy of the ''Masterplan Migration'' during the presentation of the ''Masterplan Migration
Image: picture-alliance/ZUMA Wire/M. Heine
Politics

German government sets out new immigration laws

October 2, 2018

The coalition government has hammered out new laws that prioritize education, age, and financial security. The laws are based on the Canadian model.

https://p.dw.com/p/35qVe

Germany's coalition government announced in the early hours of Tuesday that they had agreed on new immigration laws after several months of back and forth over immigration policy. The new laws will be inspired by the oft-touted Canada model, and would make it more difficult for the poor and uneducated to immigrate to Germany, according to a draft of the deal seen by journalists.

The deal "adheres to the principle of separating asylum and labor migration," and ensures that those who have a legal right to claim asylum under German law will still be able to do so.

The outline of the proposed law states, however, that non-EU citizens without higher education or, preferably, a concrete job offer, will not be able to live in Germany: "We do not want any immigration from unqualified third-country nationals," the deal states.

Like the Canada model, prospective immigrants would be ranked according to level of education, age, language skills, job offers, and "financial security."

Altmaier on immigration law

No special treatment for well-integrated rejected refugees

The agreement was signed by the Social Democrat (SPD) Labor Minister Hubertus Heil and Interior Minister Horst Seehofer of the CSU, the Bavarian sister party of Chancellor Angela Merkel's Christian Democrats (CDU). Seehofer has been pushing for immigration reform since taking office, going so far as to threaten to resign in June if his demands were not met. 

"Skilled workers from abroad are already making an important contribution to the competitiveness of the German economy," the paper states, noting the need for more highly-qualified employees.

One issue not included in the deal is a special dispensation sought by the SPD for refugees whose asylum applications have been rejected but are already well integrated in German society.

Heil told German news agency DPA that Seehofer had agreed, however, that the government should more closely take care "not to deport any of the wrong people."

The government will also retain the right to close off immigration for certain job categories as it sees fit.

es/aw (dpa, Reuters)

Skip next section Explore more
Skip next section Related topics
Skip next section DW's Top Story

DW's Top Story

Russian President Vladimir Putin lays a wreath to the Eternal Flame at the Hall of Military Glory at the Mamayev Kurgan World War Two Memorial complex in Volgograd

Ukraine updates: Putin compares Ukraine to Stalingrad battle

Skip next section More stories from DW
Go to homepage