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Police and a fire brigade vehicle
Image: Imago Images/Blaulicht News/S. Peters
Society

Deadly WWII explosive discovered in Hamburg garage

Sou-Jie van Brunnersum
June 14, 2020

A detonator with an explosive device from the Second World War has been found during an apartment clearance in the northern German port city. The controlled explosion prompted the evacuation of the nearby area.

https://p.dw.com/p/3dk9U

A highly dangerous World War II explosive was found in a garage in the northern German city of Hamburg, police said Sunday. 

The explosive was discovered when a flat was being cleared a day earlier. Police closed off an adjacent park and called out the bomb disposal squad to carry out a controlled explosion. 

The fire brigade confirmed that the object was a hazardous anti-aircraft grenade detonator with an explosive device.

The bomb disposal squad could not defuse the relic at the scene, and instead had to conduct a controlled blast in an adjacent park. 

Read more: Germany: Police rescue woman held captive by ex-boyfriend for a week

Police cordoned off the park and a nearby parking lot at around 5:30 p.m. local time (1530 UTC/GMT) as the hourlong operation got underway. 

"The detonator used for anti-aircraft grenades in WWII … has been successfully destroyed. All lockdowns have been lifted," Hamburg fire brigades tweeted.

Nobody was injured in the operation.

The discovery of unexploded World War II bombs in Hamburg and other German cities is not unusual.

The country experienced heavy bombing from Allied forces during the conflict, and explosive devices are frequently unearthed still today, especially at construction sites. 

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