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Mohamed Badie
Image: Reuters

Egypt: Badie sentenced to death

April 11, 2015

An Egyptian court has sentenced Muslim Brotherhood leader Mohammed Badie and 13 others to death for inciting violence. Meanwhile, a US-Egyptian citizen has been sentenced to life imprisonment for supporting the group.

https://p.dw.com/p/1F6HG

Mohammed Badie, the leader of the outlawed Muslim Brotherhood, was sentenced to death on Saturday alongside 13 other senior members of the group, including two Islamists who have fled the country.

The men were found guilty of inciting chaos and violence. They were alleged to have created an "operations room" to organize strikes against the state, after the army ousted former President Mohammed Morsi in July 2013.

Members of the Brotherhood deny involvement in the attacks. An al Qaeda-inspired group based in the Sinai Peninsula has since claimed responsibility for the worst of them.

Badie has already been handed four life terms in separate cases. Saturday's sentences can be appealed before the Court of Cassation, which has overturned dozens of other death sentences, including against Badie.

The court also sentenced US-Egyptian citizen Mohammed Soltan and 38 others to life in jail for supporting the group and transmitting false news. He is the son of Brotherhood preacher Salah Soltan, who was also among the 13 sentenced to death on Saturday.

The 27-year-old has gained a huge following on social media due to the hashtag and profile 'FreeSoltan.' Supporters of the Kansas-born peace activist claim he has been unjustly held for 595 days. Soltan spent the last 14 months on hunger strike, which has resulted in him being hospitalized several times.

Soltan's father, Salah, was also among those sentenced to death with Mohammed Badie.

ksb/jr (Reuters, AFP, AP)

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