How the Simpsons have taken on Trump | Film | DW | 02.08.2016
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How the Simpsons have taken on Trump

The show had poked fun at Donald Trump a few times before Marge and Homer officially decided to vote for Hillary Clinton in the last episode of "The Simpsons." Trump's fascinating hair is always the real star.

It is late at night and Marge can't make love until she's decided who to vote for. Untroubled, Homer turns on the television, saying "Yeap, it's the American way."

The ad that starts is a parody of Hillary Clinton's uncanny spot for the Democratic presidential primary in 2008, which asked who should answer "the call" and allow children to keep on safely sleeping.

While Hillary Clinton is simply depicted sternly reminding her husband Bill that from now on, all emergency calls will be for her, Donald Trump gets more attention in the show.

At first, he is just too busy with himself and his Twitter enemies to even answer the emergency call from the Situation Room.

By the second call, he finally answers and claims he'll be right there. Yet a whole pit crew of stylists first needs to work on his appearance - applying an orange spray tan, injecting collagen and placing his wig, which is actually a long-haired pooch.

Once he's finally ready, it's too late; the Chinese fleet is already on its way. "Just build another wall!" Trump commands. "Yes, in the ocean - loser."

After watching the ad, Marge and Homer almost agree on who to vote for. Briefly hesitating before he actually says the name, Homer first says he will vote for... Trump.

"If that's your vote, I question whether I can ever be with you again," is Marge's reaction as she puts the dog between them in their bed. "And that's how I became a democrat," concludes Homer.

Politics give Marge nightmares

It wasn't the first time Marge's night was troubled by politics.

In the episode "The Debateful Eight," she gets a panic attack after hearing voices of the different presidential hopefuls debating before Trump and Clinton were nominated as the official Republican and Democratic candidates.

"Basic manners are gone from politics. What is it with these ding-dongs?," says Marge before she starts hyperventilating.

"Just try to envision another America," Homer advises. "One where Republicans, Democrats, and Donald Trump all get along."

Then the candidates from all fields all start singing together James Taylor's "How Sweet It Is" in Marge's dream. Their performance quickly turns into a scuffle.

Donald Trump's hair has special powers, automatically twisting back into shape after he breakdanced on it.

"I was perfect, the rest of you morons were flat," he declares, which leads to claims that his casinos are flat broke, too.

'As blonde as a golden marmoset yet also grey as a long-dead donkey'

In the episode "Bart to the Future" in 2000, the creators of "The Simpsons" had envisioned a future in which Donald Trump had already been President of the United States.

This is mentioned when Lisa is elected as the "first straight female President," and has to deal with the country's difficult financial situation: "As you know, we've inherited quite a budget crunch from President Trump."

Many conspiracy theorists confused this "prediction" from 2000 with the episode "Trumptastic Voyage," which aired in July 2015, right after Trump had announced his candidacy as president in June 2015.

Here too, Donald Trump's hair causes great fascination.

Referring to the fact that Donald Trump's campaign offered actors $50 to cheer for him at his presidential announcement, Homer is recruited to hold a "Paid" sign as the businessman goes down an escalator of his Trump Tower.

Homer ends up right behind the presidential candidate and can't resist staring directly at Donald Trump's famously captivating hair. "If I touch will it heal my baldness?," Homer wonders, before he gets snatched by Trump's "gravity defying comb-over" which sends him on a trippy journey to Trump's skull.

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