Hottest July ever, US scientists say | News | DW | 20.08.2015
  1. Inhalt
  2. Navigation
  3. Weitere Inhalte
  4. Metanavigation
  5. Suche
  6. Choose from 30 Languages
Advertisement

News

Hottest July ever, US scientists say

Amid fears about the speed of climate change, scientists say July was the warmest in 135 years. This year is likely to be the hottest year since records began, surpassing an already hot 2014.

The world broke new heat records in July, becoming the hottest month in history, a US scientific agency revealed on Thursday.

This year has also experienced the warmest first seven months since modern records began in 1880, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration confirmed.

The average temperature across global land and sea surfaces was 16.61 degrees Celsius (61.86 degrees Fahrenheit), marking the hottest July ever. The previous record was set in 1998.

The new data has worried scientists of a troubling new trend in global temperatures which they expect to worsen.

"The world is warming. It is continuing to warm. That is being shown time and time again in our data," said Jake Crouch, a researcher at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information.

Bold action needed

He added that it was time to start investigation what impact the ongoing warming of the earth would have, which many scientists believe is due to the burning of fossil fuels.

Crouch said the planet's temperature got a boost this year from the El Nino effect in the Pacific Ocean.

Data revealed that year-to-date temperatures were 0.85 degree Celsius (1.53 degree Fahrenheit) higher than the 20th century average.

Several parts of the planet were much warmer than average, including Africa, which saw its second hottest July on record.

South America, parts of southern Europe, central Asia and the far western United States also reported record warmth, said the NOAA report.

Nine of the 10 hottest months on record have happened since 2005.

Crouch said that it was likely that 2015 would end up the hottest year on record, beating last year.

mm/sgb (AP, AFP)

DW recommends