German Law Professor at Center of Sex and Corruption Scandal | Germany| News and in-depth reporting from Berlin and beyond | DW | 08.09.2007
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German Law Professor at Center of Sex and Corruption Scandal

A professor at a German university has been accused of taking more than the proverbial "apple for teacher" in exchange for inflated marks. He is accused of selling qualifications to the tune of nearly 185,000 euros.

A couple watch the sunset

"Let's talk about how we can improve your grades"

The law professor at Leibniz University in the German city of Hanover is also at the center of a scandal in which it is alleged he bumped up exam marks of two of his female students.

As well as exchanging sexual favors for favorable results, the professor is also accused of selling doctorates and conspiring with two managers of a business consulting firm who worked as go-betweens for fake degrees. The managers are alleged to have paid the professor a total of 184,000 euros ($250,000) for his assistance in securing qualifications for clients.

"We very much regret the matter," Leibniz University spokeswoman Stefanie Beier told the daily Süddeutsche Zeitung. "But we assume that this is an isolated case of considerable criminal enterprise."

Hanover prosecutors are charging the unnamed professor on 78 counts of corruption.

Professor investigated after complaints

One person hands a large amount of cash to another

Congratulations, Doctor...

The professor may have got away with his sex-for-grades and doctorates-for-cash scam had it not been for his apparent weakness for the ladies. The randy prof came unstuck when other female students complained to the local examining authority, insisting that they should not have the professor marking their work after his unfair marking criteria became known.

The university began a probe on the back of the complaints which led to the suspension of the professor and his banning from university property.

Fearing the professor might seek to flee justice, a Hanover court ordered Thursday that he remain in custody.

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