World in Progress: Indigenous copyrights and Fighting for First Nations land | World | Breaking news and perspectives from around the globe | DW | 01.12.2021

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World

World in Progress: Indigenous copyrights and Fighting for First Nations land

In this edition: The textile patterns designes by indigenous weavers in Oaxaca, Mexico are hip with fashion companies who don't always compensate the designers. And: Meet Canadian First Nations activist Freda Huson who just received an alternative Nobel prize for her defending her people's culture and land.

Listen to audio 29:59

Fearless fighter for First Nations lands: Freda Huson 

Freda Huson is a couragous Indigenous Canadian who was just rewarded the Right Livelihoods award, also known as the alternative Nobel prizes, along with several other outstanding people in India, Cameroon, Russia. Huson is well known for her protests against a controversial gas pipeline that was planned to run through tribal lands. She is the chief of the Indigenous people of the Wet'suwet'en in British Coloumbia, northwestern Canada. For many years, she’s been campaigning on behalf of indigenous Canadians, the First Nation peoples, fighting for their rights.

(Report: Peter Mücke / Presenter Elliot Douglas)  

 

Indigenous Textiles Mexico - Fashion industry stealing indigenous designs

In Oaxaca, in southwestern Mexiko, the colorful designs of indigenous Mixtec are not just popular among local buyers and tourists, they've also caught the attention of international fashion companies like Zara. Ethnic patterns are in, and many are using indigenous designs to sell their products. The Mexican government has protested against cultural appropriation that does not compensate the indigenous designers. And the weavers themselves are demanding to be part of the deal.

(Report: Wolf-Dieter Vogel / presenter: Neil King)