UK parliament staff ′make 160 online porn requests daily′ | News | DW | 08.01.2018

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UK parliament staff 'make 160 online porn requests daily'

More than 24,000 requests to access porn websites were made from within the UK parliament in late 2017, data shows. The report comes as the British government tries to crack down on sexual misconduct in Westminster.

Some 160 requests a day to access online pornography have been made from within the UK Houses of Parliament since last June's general elections, Britain's Press Association (PA) reported on Monday.

The data, obtained by a PA Freedom of Information request, showed that a total of 24,473 attempts were made in that time from devices connected to the parliamentary network, which is used by MPs, Lords from the upper house, and their staff.

Although the figure represents a decrease in such attempts in comparison with previous years, it may still be troubling for authorities in view of a number of recent sexual misconduct allegations in Westminster.

Damian Green

Green is also accused of touching a political activist's knee

Prime Minister Theresa May was forced to sack former First Secretary of State Damian Green last month after he was accused of misleading police over claims that pornographic material was found on computers in his Westminster office in 2008. Green's departure is one of the factors behind an imminent Cabinet reshuffle.

Defense Minister Michael Fallon also stepped down in November amid sexual harassment allegations.

Misclicks?

Parliamentary authorities claim, however, that most attempts to access online porn — which are almost all blocked by the parliament's security software — were not intentional.

"The vast majority of 'attempts' to access them are not deliberate. The data shows 'requests' to access websites, not visits to them," a parliamentary spokesman told PA.

He added that the data also covered personal devices logged on to the guest wi-fi in parliament.

For unexplained reasons, September 2017 showed a spike in requests to access banned websites, with 9,467 requests being made from both houses, according to the Daily Telegraph, citing the same PA data.

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