Learn German with Twitter and Youtube | Culture| Arts, music and lifestyle reporting from Germany | DW | 15.09.2014
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Culture

Learn German with Twitter and Youtube

Want to learn some german via social media? The internet offers plenty of Twitter-accounts and YouTube-Channels to improve your Deutsch-knowledge. We have compiled a selection of services.

Learning a new language should always be fun. With German this might sound like a far-stretch, but you don't need to be put off by the Genitiv, the gender of articles or declension. The social web can help reconcile with some difficult German words or even with some strange expressions Germans like to use every now and then.

Needless to say, DW's very own @dw_learngerman is top on the recommend list when taking part in one of the multimedia Deutsch-Lernen courses. It offers “das Wort der Woche”, which explains important words in daily usage.

On the main dw.de/deutsch-lernen page, users can find plenty of tools and tasks to improve their language skills. Take the placement test to evaluate your skill level or participate in one of the interactive learning courses.

If you need to brush up on German articles (after all, there are three of them and not always logical) check out the Youtube-Channel "Deutsch für Euch", brought to you by @KatjaDFE. The account has 43.000 followers, so you're probably not alone if you confuse "der, die und das".

Germans have a tendency to celebrate their language by translating some of their clichés or wordplays literally into English. That is seldom useful. But always funny. @Germanquatsch shows what this can end up like:

For those with more advanced language skills, why not delve into a side of German culture with its “Forbidden”-Signs”. @esistuntersagt collects them.

For those seeking more knowledge of every-day-language @germandailyword provides input. Its tweets come with a link showing examples. Its explanations may sometimes be useful in German offices (zügig: swift, quick, brisk; or leertaste: space bar).

The hashtag #dailydeutsch delivers a handful of tweets to catch the attention of the twitter-folk.

With the Oktoberfest about to start, foreign tourists in Munich might want to review some of the basic vocabulary for ordering a beer and navigating through the crowds.

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