Kenyan Cherono claims spectacular win at Boston Marathon | News | DW | 15.04.2019
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Kenyan Cherono claims spectacular win at Boston Marathon

The Boston Marathon turned into a two-man sprint race for Kenyan Lawrence Cherono and Ethiopian Lelisa Desisa, with Cherono only edging out his rival at the finish line. It's been six years since the attack at the event.

Boston Marathon winner Lawrence Cherono (picture-alliance/dpa/W. Townson)

Lawrence Cherono edged out Lelisa Desisa in the final stretch

The latest winner of the Boston Marathon is Kenyan Lawrence Cherono with a time of 2:07:57, the organizers of the world's oldest marathon race posted on Monday.

Cherono was only two seconds faster than the runner-up Lelisa Desisa from Ethiopia. Desisa pulled in front of Cherono some 200 meters before the end of the 42-kilometer (26.2 mile) race, but Cherono sprinted to catch up and narrowly won the two-way charge to the finish line.

Another Kenyan, Kenneth Kipkemoi, placed third with a time of 2:08:07, 10 seconds behind Cherono.

In the women's race, Ethiopian Worknesh Degefa carried the day with 2:23:31, more than half a minute ahead of Edna Kiplagat. American Jordan Hasay was third. The woman's race also saw veteran runner Joan Benoit Samuelson, who won the event twice, in 1979 and 1983, come back to complete the marathon once more. Now at the age of 61, Samuelson reached the finish line in exactly 3:04:00, some 40 minutes slower than her time 40 years ago.

Worknesh Degefa crossing the line in Boston (picture-alliance/dpa/C. Krupa)

Worknesh Degefa crossing the line in Boston

Some 30,000 runners had to contend with wet and chilly weather on Monday. Ahead of the event, Boston officials held a minute of silence to honor the sixth anniversary of the 2013 Islamist bombing which killed three people and wounded around 260.

This years' event also saw the mayor of the UK city of Manchester, Andy Burnham, take part in the US race to honor the memory of another terror attack, the 2017 Manchester Arena bombing. The suicide bombing killed 22 people at a pop music concert.

"I'm running just to show [the families of the victims] in a very small way that I'm thinking about them everyday," Burnham told local paper The Boston Globe.

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dj/msh (AP, AFP)

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