Brexit: Boris Johnson says UK will break away like Hulk | News | DW | 15.09.2019
  1. Inhalt
  2. Navigation
  3. Weitere Inhalte
  4. Metanavigation
  5. Suche
  6. Choose from 30 Languages
Advertisement

News

Brexit: Boris Johnson says UK will break away like Hulk

Boris Johnson has vowed that the UK will escape the EU's chains on October 31 just like the comic book hero if no new deal is reached. The British prime minister is due to hold fresh talks in Brussels on Monday.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Sunday compared his country's exit from the European Union next month to The Incredible Hulk's ability to burst through chains.

"The madder Hulk gets, the stronger Hulk gets," he told the Mail on Sunday newspaper.

Referring to Bruce Banner, the fictional scientist who transforms into his powerful green alter ego in the famous comic book and film series, Johnson said: "Banner might be bound in manacles, but when provoked he would explode out of them."

Read more: Pro-Brexit MP: UK, EU relationship will 'never be the same again'

Watch video 02:15

UK Parliament rejects PM's call for early election

The UK leader reiterated his determination to pull the country out of the EU on October 31 if no alternative deal is agreed.

He made the remarks despite British lawmakers passing legislation preventing him from proceeding with his threat of a disorderly Brexit.

No further delay

Johnson, however, insisted he would find a way to circumvent the September 4 vote, which ordered him to delay Brexit for a second time.

"Hulk always escaped, no matter how tightly bound in he seemed to be — and that is the case for this country. We will come out on October 31," he vowed.

Read more: Facebook returns to center of British politics

However, Johnson appeared confident that a last-minute deal could be struck with Brussels, saying "we will get there" and that a "huge amount of progress is being made."

Johnson has said he wants to renegotiate the Irish border backstop that Britain and the EU negotiated as part of the divorce deal.

The backstop, which would only be employed if the two sides fail to secure a future trade deal, would allow the free flow of goods to continue between the UK territory of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, a member of the EU.

No backstop alternative

The EU has so far insisted that the backstop remain, and has complained that Britain has not presented any detailed alternative. 

Read more: Brexit: How the EU is responding to latest uncertainty

Watch video 00:38

Boris Johnson in Ireland: 'The UK will never ever institute checks at the border'

Johnson is due to meet with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker on Monday.

The British prime minister, meanwhile, is without a parliamentary majority after 21 MPs from his ruling Conservative Party rebelled to back the law blocking a no-deal Brexit and were expelled.

One of them was former Universities Minister Sam Gyimah, who on Saturday defected to the Liberal Democrats, becoming their 18th MP in the 650-seat chamber.

The Lib Dems are campaigning for Britain to remain in the EU.

Next week will also be crucial for Johnson as the UK Supreme Court considers the legality of his decision to suspend Parliament earlier this month until October 14.

mm/rc (AFP, AP, dpa, Reuters)      

Each evening at 1830 UTC, DW's editors send out a selection of the day's hard news and quality feature journalism. You can sign up to receive it directly here.

DW recommends

WWW links

Audios and videos on the topic