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US Election Outcome Impacts Europe

A day after the US poll, DW-WORLD readers comment on Bush's re-election and predict a rocky future road for international relations.

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What awaits the world over the next four years?

The following comments reflect the views of our readers as received so far. If you would like to have your say on this our another issue, please click on our feedback button below. For editing purposes, not all reader comments will be automatically published. DW-WORLD reserves the right to edit for length and appropriateness of content.

I would just like to say as a young American, I am definitely opposed to Bush's decisions concerning world policies. He has time and time again gone against what most Americans hope for the future of this country and the countries that rely upon us. He has created a dichotomy within our nation that is cause for alarm. I have a hard time sleeping at night knowing that he is in power, and that my vote today for J. Kerry went without notice. I just hope that the people of the world can look beyond the governing body of America at present and realize that a large number of Americans want what the world wants: a future of peace, understanding and a commitment to the further prosperity of the world as a whole. -- Autumn Baker

Bush has been a disaster for our international relations; he does not have the political experience that a lifelong political career has given Kerry; he does not exhibit the desire or need to use diplomatic means to build international (or indeed, domestic) consensus or form coalitions. And he does not admit mistakes. Re-election would surely, in his mind, give him the "mandate" to practice more of the same unilateral, unsettlingly authoritarian governing policies both at home and abroad. -- Louise Cantwell, USA

I am of the opinion that the American election will be crucial for the world. It is clear that if America re-elects the Bush administration he will have an important endorsement of his current foreign policy. In political terms this fact might endanger the current situation, specifically in the Middle East. It is also clear that the "old Europe" is not a current friend of the Bush administration. Our world needs new politicians. I hope that American can understand this necessity. -- Carlos Adrián Ferretti, Republic of Argentina

US-German relations

Porträt Gerhard Schröder

German Chancellor Gerhard Schröder

The best way to improve US-German relations is to replace Chancellor Gerhard Schröder with a pragmatic leader. After all it's his fault we will be turning our backs on your country and that your economy is so bad compared to the US and Great Britain. Next, send in troops to assist us in the conversion of Iraq to a democratic country. And last, apologize for letting down your staunchest ally. -- J. Chao, USA

You ask which candidate would be best for improving relations with Europe, my answer is neither. As your article said, the foreign policy would not change, nor would the arrogance in Washington improve. Because Kerry speaks foreign languages does not make him a better president. Bush and Kerry are nothing but front men for the people behind the scenes that are pulling the strings. -- Helen Schneider, California, USA

Kerry would have been better for Europe and the planet. Bush and associates have gotten greedy. Their total disregard for life on the planet will foment and encourage increasing resistance from peoples affected by Bush's policies to change the economic climate of the planet through aggression, misinformation and fear. What happened to diplomacy in the neighborhood? Our war toys have become too dangerous to continue this way. Bosnia, Afghanistan and Iraq are heavily contaminated by US "depleted uranium" munitions dust, in the soil, water and air. But, what happens if this greed brings nuclear back into play? It's time for a change before we create our own Armegeddon. -- Daniel Ferry

The re-election of George W. Bush is best for America and the rest of the free world. Although tensions are apparent, Europe and other democracies count on the United States on many levels. Kerry is a proven opportunist who has achieved nothing greater than marrying well twice. The rest of the world may not agree with our president, but at least they would not wonder what he really stands for or whether he would be dependable and not bend with the political winds. I live in Germany and love this country and its people as my second home. You do not have to love our president to acknowledge him as a strong leader as compared to a waffler. -- Vivla Ray Hill

I do not think it is appropriate for foreign governments to voice their choice for US president. While most individuals have a preference, it is not in the best interest of the country that the foreign officials make their opinions public. If their candidate of choice does not win, how will that affect the relations with the US? I believe it is best that they keep their comments to themselves as they must work with whomever wins the election. It is not worth jeopardizing future relations over a comment. -- Elisabeth Kolenko, Canada

It's the US election not the European election. Quite frankly, I don't really care what results would be best for Europe. -- A. Barnes, Charlotte, NC, USA

The US president's most important tasks are supporting and leading its own country. But since the United States have been taking some kind of leading position in the world, they also have some responsibility to the world and the alliances/partners. Even so, most Americans do not know much about or are interested in the opinion of foreign countries' leaders. -- Christiane Kaufmann, Germany, currently living in the USA

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