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Tomorrow Today 11.06.12 | 00:30 - 01:00 UTC

Celtic Calendar - prehistoric astronomy

Topic Celtic statue (Source: AP Photo)

Celtic Calendar - prehistoric astronomy

Topic Zukunft Valleriani (Source: DW)

Studio guest: Dr. Matteo Valleriani of the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science

Topic Graphene

Graphene - innovative material for the electronics of the future

Topic pigeon (Source: Fotolia)

Tomorrow Today Viewer's Question

As different as they may seem, zebrafish have many things in common with humans - some diseases, for example. Researchers have been investigating an eye disorder in zebrafish to help develop a treatment for use in people.

Topics

Model Organisms - zebrafish in human medical research

Zebrafish are surprisingly similar to humans. Swiss genetics researchers are using the fish to study an eye disease that also affects humans. In what is known as spontaneous nystagmus the eye does not track moving objects, but moves in the opposite direction.

The condition can lead to vision impairment. The scientists found that in fish with the disorder the optic nerves do not cross. They hope this discovery will help lead to a treatment in humans.

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Celtic Calendar - prehistoric astronomy

An archaeologist studying a Celtic burial mound in Germany has discovered that it was not only a grave site, but a huge astronomical chronometer. The prince's grave at its center is part of a gigantic calendar. With the help of technology developed by NASA the researcher found that the arrangement of the other 130 graves in the tumulus correspond to the constellations in the northern night sky.

The Celtic lunar calendar may be proof of the astronomical sophistication of a European culture long before the Roman era.

WWW links

Studio guest: Dr. Matteo Valleriani of the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science

An archaeologist studying a Celtic burial mound in Germany has discovered that it was not only a grave site, but a huge astronomical chronometer. The prince's grave at its center is part of a gigantic calendar. We ask Dr. Matteo Valleriani why archaeological findings are important for people today.

Graphene - innovative material for the electronics of the future

Scientists in Erlangen have managed to produce graphene in large quantities with the help of soap and ultrasound. Graphene is the thinnest material known to us. It's transparent and harder than diamond. The ultra-thin carbon layer is an excellent conductor of electricity and heat.

Its properties have opened up a whole set of new industrial applications - like the mobile phone you can wrap around your arm, or a carbon-based computer. It also offers possibilities for making stable and highly conducting plastics.

Tomorrow Today Viewer's Question

How do homing pigeons find their way back?

  • Date 11.06.12 | 00:30 - 01:00 UTC
  • Broadcast times 11.06.12 | 11:30 - 12:00 UTC, 11.06.12 | 15:30 - 16:00 UTC, 13.06.12 | 03:30 - 04:00 UTC, 13.06.12 | 09:03 - 09:30 UTC, 13.06.12 | 19:30 - 20:00 UTC
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  • Permalink http://dw.com/p/151Um
  • Date 11.06.12 | 00:30 - 01:00 UTC
  • Broadcast times
    11.06.12 | 11:30 - 12:00 UTC
    11.06.12 | 15:30 - 16:00 UTC
    13.06.12 | 03:30 - 04:00 UTC
    13.06.12 | 09:03 - 09:30 UTC
    13.06.12 | 19:30 - 20:00 UTC
  • Share Send Facebook Google+
  • Print Print this page
  • Permalink http://dw.com/p/151Um