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Europe

Suspect Confesses in Lindh Killing

The man suspected of killing Swedish Foreign Minister Anna Lindh in a brutal stabbing incident last year has confessed to the crime, a prosecutor said Wednesday.

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Lindh's death was mourned in Sweden and across Europe.

Mijailo Mijailovic, 25, admitted to stabbing the Swedish foreign minister as she shopped in a Stockholm department store last year.

Until now Mijailovic had said he had nothing to do with the attack. Lindh died on Sept. 11, a day after being stabbed repeatedly while shopping in a Stockholm department store.

“During interrogation yesterday he confessed to the killing,” Chief Prosecutor Krister Petersson told Reuters news agency. “We are not willing to say exactly what he said.” The confession was confirmed by an assistant at the office of Mijailovic’s attorney.

Suspect could face 10 years to life in prison

Mijailo Mijailovic Lindh Attentäter Schweden Porträtfoto

Mijailo Mijailovic is seen in this undated police photo.

Mijailovic (photo) faces 10 years to life in prison. Should he be found to be mentally ill, however, he may not go to jail at all. “The sentence will depend on the medical examination,” Petersson said.

Charges could be filed on January 12, in which case the trial would begin by January 19.

Mijailovic was born in Sweden to Serbian immigrants. Police have said that their evidence includes DNA found on the murder weapon. The motive for the crime remains unknown.

Lindh was touted as next prime minister

Lindh, a 46-year-old mother of two children, was widely expected to be Sweden’s next prime minister.

Olof Palme

Olof Palme

The killing shocked the nation and brought back painful memories of the 1986 assassination of Prime Minister Olof Palme (photo). Many hope the confession will bring the country some peace of mind.

"If the suspect had been sentenced without having confessed, this could have led to years of speculation about whether the right person was sentenced," Justice Minister Thomas Bodstroen said in an Associated Press report. "This can be avoided now."

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