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Global Ideas

Pacific islands face fishing crisis

As the population on the Pacific islands grows, finding enough fish to eat is becoming increasingly difficult. Now, the fishing industry is switching to tuna to tackle the problem.

The coral fishermen of Vanuatu are facing a growing crisis: they are increasingly returning from their fishing expeditions with ever dwindling hauls. That‘s because the coral reefs that they travel out to are disappearing at an alarming rate as are the fish stocks near the coast that have traditionally served as the staple diet for people in the region. It‘s a similar story in the other Pacific Islands too.

A variety of factors are responsible for the phenomenon. In addition to environmental pollution, rising temperatures and a creeping acidity in the ocean‘s waters – both a consequence of climate change – have taken a huge toll on the reefs.

In fact, the ocean’s chemical makeup has changed more now than it has in 55 million years. That has put incredible pressure on the region’s embattled coral reefs, which have seen their rich biodiversity diminish.

More people, fewer fish

Foto: A large group of people from above (Foto: CC BY 2.0: TheBigTouffe/flickr.com: http://www.flickr.com/photos/guiguibu91/2889883615/in/photostream/)

The growing population has led to a shortage of food - and climate change has exacerbated the problem

"Coral fishing in the region could shrink by 20 percent by the year 2050," says Johann Bell, a fishing expert who lives on New Caledonia, an archipelago located some 1,500 kilometers east of Australia. Bell works with the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC), an organization of Pacific island countries and territories dealing with environmental and social issues.

The decline of the fish catch presents a troubling problem for SPC members. "We have observed that the gap between the amount of fish available in the reefs and the amount that we need to feed the population is growing," says Bell. And the numbers don’t lie: that gap amounts to 4,000 tons of fish a year.

The disappearing reefs have only exacerbated an existing problem. The population on southwest Pacific Ocean islands continues to expand at a rapid rate, expected to reach 50 percent by 2030. If that happens, the islands would need an additional 150,000 tons of fish a year.

Foto: A swarm of tuna swimming underwater (Foto: CC BY 2.0: TheAnimalDay.org/flickr.com: http://www.flickr.com/photos/theanimalday/7142881913/)

A fourth of the world’s tuna stock is found in the waters surrounding eight Pacific islands: Micronesia, Kribati, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Tuvalu, the Marshall Islands and the Solomon Islands

But attempting to increase the catch for coral fishermen would only put the reefs under further pressure. "When you don’t cultivate an eco-system in a sustainable way, when you overfish, it is significantly less prepared to deal with the changing climate," says Doris Soto, a senior officer of the Fisheries and Aquaculture Department at the Food and Agricultulture Organization (FAO).

That is why fishermen in the region are not permitted to catch more than 3 of the 50 to 100 tons of fish pro square meter of water each year.

Yet, fish forms the main diet on the Pacific islands, and remains an important source of protein for residents. As coastal fishing wanes, so too does the locals' most basic staple. Vanuautu, like most Pacific islands, has been forced to look for alternatives. But the question is just where.

One alternative would be on land. For instance, the Nile tilapia is a large fish and the most prominent example of species that can be cultivated in fisheries and aquacultures on land.

The Pacific Community has recommended the increased use of freshwater aquacultures, and the Nile tilapia is the perfect solution. Since the region is expected to get more rain in future, the Nile tilapa can now even be bred in areas which have received little precipitation so far.

Foto: Fresh tuna on ice (Foto: CC BY 2.0: TheAnimalDay.org/flickr.com: http://www.flickr.com/photos/theanimalday/7142456645/)

To catch tuna, fishermen have to venture far past the coral reefs where they have traditionally caught their bounty

But the SPC’s main solution to the question of alternative food sources lies further off the coast. Far into the ocean’s turquoise waters, huge swarms of tuna swim freely, offering an enticing alternative. But the fishing sector first needs to adapt its ways to learn how and where to catch the fish before tuna can become a fixture on lunch tables.

Luring tuna to the coast

Fishermen have already been forced to venture further out into the ocean in their small fishing boats for catch. That means more fuel is needed, raising costs.

That‘s why the Pacific Community recommends installing Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs) to attract ocean fish and other sea creatures back towards the coast. FADs are usually man-made floats or buoys that are anchored to the ocean floor with long ropes. They lure tuna and other marine life that often seek protection in the shadow of the floating devices.

Vanuatu has already started experimenting with FADs, installing one between the islands of Nguna, Pele and Efate. That has made it easier for the surrounding 30 communities to access fish.

"Now our fishermen can fish in the vicinity of their homes," Mariwota, a village elder from the community of Taloa was quoted as saying in a joint report by the Pacific Community and Germany’s federal development agency (GIZ). "They are now ensured a good catch," he said.

Selling by-catch at local markets

Foto: A fishing boat anchored in the harbor (Foto: CC BY SA 2.0: Abaconda Management Group/flickr.com: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/)

Many Pacific islands earn a lot of money selling fishing licenses to foreign shipping companies

The approach also involves pushing foreign fleets, that catch tuna in the region on a large scale, to contribute towards improving the food security of the local population. That‘s because it‘s not just tuna but also other marine creatures, too small to be processed in canning facilities, that end up in the huge fishing nets. The practice has long been criticized by environmental organizations as well.


The SPC now suggests that this by-catch, that in the past was thrown back in the ocean, should be used to feed the local populace. "We want the fleets to be forced to bring their by-catch to land and sell it in cities here before they return to their home countries with the tuna they’ve caught," says Johann Bell.

Bell also believes that the Pacific islands should reduce the number of fishing licenses handed out to foreign companies. "The island countries should hold onto more of those licenses to feed their own people," he says. His concept could be especially helpful to the islands that lie further west, like Papua New Guinea and Palau. That‘s because climate change is set to affect the distribution of tuna stocks in the region.

"Our latest studies have shown that climate change will cause tuna fish to head east and to subtropical regions," says Bell. He predicts that by the end of the century, the island countries in the west could see their tuna catch shrink by up to a third, while the catch increases in the east.

That is why the Pacific islands have come up with the Vessel Day Scheme, or VDS, where vessel owners can buy and trade licenses for days fishing at sea. The scheme helps reduce the amount of tuna catch and more fairly distribute the fish among the participating islands.

"Originally, the system was developed so that all the island countries could profit equally from the tuna populations, which have long traveled back and forth in the ocean’s waters," says Johann Bell. "But it is also a good way to adapt to climate change."

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