1. Inhalt
  2. Navigation
  3. Weitere Inhalte
  4. Metanavigation
  5. Suche
  6. Choose from 30 Languages

Culture

Learning How to Teach Foreign Language

Memorizing verb conjugations and adjective declinations is never any fun, especially when there's no immediate connection to real language usage. And in Germany, that's exactly what educators want to change.

default

Language learning requires more than memorizing vocabulary

Anyone who's ever tried to learn a foreign language knows how difficult and frustrating it can be. Memorizing verb conjugations and adjective declinations is never any fun, especially when there's no immediate connection to real language usage. And in Germany, that's exactly what educators want to change.

The scene repeats itself over and over again, wherever a foreign language is being taught. Teachers spend hours going over rules and regulations, quizzing pupils, forcing them to repeat banal sentences like, "My name is... What's your name" until the intonation is exactly right and everyone can go home feeling they got the gist of speaking the new language.

But did the pupils really learn anything?

Chances are they didn't. Neither the pupils who dutifully repeat the question and answer game nor the teachers who instruct it have fully embraced the concept of learning a foreign language. And once the pupils are placed in an environment where they're forced to speak the foreign language, they'll suddenly realize that all their schoolbook learning amounts to very little.

Languages live through real usage, through constant contact with people who rely on it to communicate, to convey ideas and thoughts, to conduct business and tell stories. Unfortunately, much of foreign language instruction in schools is passive in nature and places more emphasis on grammar than on actual application of the language.

DW recommends