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Former New York mayor Rudy Giuliani favored to become Secretary of State

Former New York mayor Rudy Giuliani has emerged as favorite to become the next Secretary of State. He is known for his hard-line law-and-order views and brusque manner.

The 72-year-old Giuliani has been a top adviser and supporter of president-elect Donald Trump for months. At a gathering of CEOs sponsored by the Wall Street Journal on Monday, Giuliani said that he "won't be attorney general" leaving the way open for an alternative post. 

Twice mayor of New York City, Giuliani ran for the US Senate in 2000 and sought the Republican presidential nomination in 2008.  

Giuliani appeared with Trump on stage during the election:

Apart from Giuliani, John Bolton, who served as US ambassador to the United Nations in the George W. Bush presidency, has also been cited as a possible secretary of state for the administration of Donald Trump. In an op-ed for The New York Times last year Bolton advocated bombing Iran to halt the country's development of nuclear weapons. Other names being aired for the post include former House of Representatives Speaker Newt Gingrich.

Media commentators have suggested there is infighting within the Trump camp over the appointments. One CNN report suggested it was like a "knife fight."  

"The disagreements highlight the dilemma faced by Trump, who is now torn between a campaign promise to shake up Washington and the need to build a national security team with policy experience," the CNN report said.

Trump was due to meet with Vice President-elect Mike Pence on Tuesday

Bannon reaction

As Trump continues to develop the team which will surround him as president, there was ongoing reaction to his decision on Sunday to appoint Steve Bannon to serve as his chief strategist and senior advisor.

Bannon heads the ultra-conservative Breitbart News which is supportive of the so-called "alt-right" movement. Jewish and Muslim leaders have expressed concerns.

President Barack Obama was asked on Monday about Bannon's appointment but would only say: "It would not be appropriate for me to comment on every appointment that the president-elect starts making, if I want to be consistent with the notion that we're going to try to facilitate a smooth transition," he said.

jm/bw (Reuters, AP, AFP)

 

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