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Filmmaker Michael Moore targets Trump in new documentary

Michael Moore is releasing a new film about Donald Trump. The Republican candidate had a rough Tuesday, with US President Barack Obama telling the man who is seeking to replace him to "stop whining."

Michael Moore is debuting a new documentary about his adventures in "TrumpLand" after a theater in the US state of Ohio apparently canceled the filmmaker's one-man play about the Republican candidate.

"See the film Ohio Republicans tried to shut down," the IFC Center wrote. "Oscar-winner Michael Moore dives right into hostile territory with his daring and hilarious one-man show, deep in the heart of TrumpLand in the weeks before the 2016 election."

In addition to "Michael Moore in TrumpLand," earlier this year the director released "Where to Invade Next," a search abroad for positive social policies that could benefit the United States. Moore won the 2003 Academy Award for best documentary with 2002's "Bowling for Columbine," which takes on US gun culture. During the tight 2004 US presidential election campaign, he skewered the Republican incumbent, George W Bush, with "Fahrenheit 9/11".

Moore backed Bernie Sanders in the Democratic primaries and hasn't endorsed Hillary Clinton, citing her support for invading Iraq as a New York senator.

The film's regular cinema run will begin on Wednesday.

'Stop whining'

On Tuesday, Barack Obama told Trump to "stop whining" with his claims that the election is rigged and instead use the remaining three weeks till November 8 to make his case to voters. "I have never seen in my lifetime, or in modern political history, any presidential candidate trying to discredit the elections and the election process before votes have even taken place," Obama said.

Obama said there was no evidence of electoral fraud, stressing that polls are run by state and local officials from both major US parties. The president said candidates who begin complaining before the votes are cast "don't have what it takes to be in this job."

On Monday, Trump tweeted: "Of course there is large scale voter fraud happening on and before Election Day." Later, Trump wrote that, should voters not elect him the US president, "history will remember 2017 as the year America lost its independence."

Trump's running mate has struggled to defend such assertions. Indiana Governor Mike Pence said Trump meant to encourage supporters to "respectfully participate ... to ensure the integrity of the election." Pence said the campaign would honor results.

People magazine reports that six people have corroborated a reporter's account of assault by Trump. Natasha Stoynoff wrote that he grabbed her and kissed her in 2005 while she attempted to report a story about the celebrity and his wife for the magazine.

Trump, who remained atop the crowded Republican primary field, trails Hillary Clinton by 7 points in national polls, according to RealClearPolitics.

Watch video 01:11

Michelle Obama takes on Donald Trump

mkg/jr (Reuters, AFP, dpa, AP)

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