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Asia

China issues new anti-corruption rules

China has stepped up its anti-corruption rules. All government officials must report their personal details such as income, assets and the whereabouts of their family members, state media said.

Many ordinary Chinese have complained about official corruption in recent years

Many ordinary Chinese have complained about official corruption in recent years

The new rules went into effect on Sunday. They apply to all officials in government posts, political parties and state-owned companies, according to the China Daily. Under the rules, the officials are required to report their salary, income from other sources, property owned by them and their family members and investments. Officials are also required to inform the authorities of changes in marital status and the occupations of their spouses and children spouses and children.

Officials in China have a long history of hiding their illicit incomes under the names of spouses or other relatives.

All the officials are now required to report their salary and income from other sources

All the officials are now required to report their salary and income from other sources

Punishment for defaulters

The state media said those officials who failed to follow the new rules would face punishment ranging from criticism of their conduct to dismissal. But, as the China Daily reported, the new rules fall short of requiring that the income and assets of Chinese officials be made public.

The new rules were issued jointly by the State Council, China's cabinet and the ruling Communist Party. They are an expansion of regulations adopted in 1995 and 2006. The move comes amid increasing complains by ordinary Chinese citizens about growing official corruption. Tackling graft is crucial for the Communist Party, which sees it as a major threat to political stability.

du/AFP/AP
Editor: Grahame Lucas

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