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Travel

A sneak peak at the world's longest skywalk

Travelers will soon be able to walk across the world's longest and highest glass-bottom bridge, which spans two cliffs in China's Hunan province.

Workers were photographed this week installing the bridge's first piece of glass. The six meters wide bridge, in the Tianmenshan National Forest Park in Zhangjiajie, stretches 430 meters (1,410 ft.) across a deep gorge with a terrifying 300 meter drop to the bottom of the valley in China's Hunan province.

Construction on the bridge, originally expected to be finished at the end of 2015, is now expected to open in May this year. Once complete, the bridge will be able to support a maximum of 800 people at a time.

Designed by Israeli architect Haim Dotan, the glass-bottom bridge will also feature the world's highest bungee jump and serve as a runway for fashion shows.

This is not the first heart-stopping glass structure constructed in China. Last year, the Longgang National Geological Park in Chongqing, unveiled what was then the world's longest glass-bottomed cantilever skywalk. The structure that dangles precariously on the edge of a cliff stretches out an astounding 1,010 meters (3,314 ft.), offering stunning views to those who dare to walk on thin air.

Stunning as the view is, tourists will likely tread carefully. In October last year,cracks appeared in the mountainside glass walkway in Yuntaishan Scenic Park, in China's central Henan province, just two weeks after opening. Witnesses said the incident sent visitors running and screaming in panic. Park officials said the damage was superficial and posed no threat to safety

Zhangjiajie National Forest Park is China's first forest reserve. The area is home to striking sandstone and quartz cliffs. The new bridge will be hanging above Zhangjiajie Grand Canyon. Besides the glass structures, Zhangjiajie, a 56 square-kilometer designated tourist park inside the bigger Wulingyuan Scenic Area has one more claim to fame. It was the inspiration for the breathtaking planet of Pandora in James Cameron's 2009 blockbuster film, "Avatar"!

at/sbc (cnn)